The Removal of Donald Trump from the White House (with apologies to John Betjeman, and Oscar Wilde)

He swallowed an Ambien capsule,
And gazed at the Washington skies.
He pouted, characteristically,
And narrowed his gimlet eyes,

For the Resolute Desk had been cleared now,
Melania’s photo, and all;
And “The Bronco Buster” by Remington
Left a reproachful gap on the wall.

“I got to remember my Cestrol.
Kayleigh, just see it’s in hand —
How could they have been so nasty?
Help me to understand.

“And you’ve brought me the latest Fake News:
All Harris bullshit and stuff…
Know what? They betrayed the people,
And they’ll pay for it soon enough.

“There’s my best set of clubs in the West Wing —
My Titleists are back in Trump Tower,
With the balls sent by Vladimir Pooting,
During my first month in power…”

“More Ambien — where is my water?
Can’t you ring for the goddam staff!”
(His continuing zest for denial
Caused Kayleigh to stifle a laugh.)

A thump, and a murmur of voices —
”Can they do this to me? This is weird…”
As the door of the Office swung open
And TWO MILITARY POLICEMEN appeared:

“Mr. Trump, we are here to escort you
From the Office denied you by Law:
We must ask you to leave with us quietly,
By the Jackson Place janitor’s door.”

He rose, and he put down the Fake News.
He staggered — and, terrible-eyed,
He brushed past a bust of Lincoln,
And was helped to a limo outside.

The Tulsaloser Shuffle: Donald Trump’s Walk of Shame

From: The Walk of Shame, by Mira Moshe, Nicoleta Corbu, Nova Science Publishers, 2015
“The term “walk of shame” is deeply rooted in the idea that shame is a difficult emotion stemming from a feeling of inferiority or social discomfort, which causes a person to wish to disappear, become invisible, be “swallowed up by the earth”. However, sometimes exactly at such a moment of disgrace, individuals are publicly exposed to the full extent of their misery and must walk “the walk of shame” witnessed by family, friends and acquaintances. Shame, considered by some to have genetic origins, is an integral part of social circumstances and settings in accordance with a set of values, patterns of thought and the individual’s physiological make-up. Shame is the result of familial, social and media processes. Thus the walk of shame does not take place privately behind closed doors, but on city sidewalks, in the workplace, in newspaper columns and on television and computer screens. It is not surprising, then, to discover that the tremendous power of shame has expropriated it from the individual’s control in the private sphere to the public sector, creating a collective punishing mechanism whose goal is to warn against undesirable behaviour. Indeed, a person’s public humiliation is a form of punishment, a negative sanction leading to disgrace, debasement and mortification. This book discusses the walk of shame from a cultural perspective, focusing on contexts, strategies, images etc., that reveals the many facets of a controversial concept.”