Jellinek’s Electrical Safety: a Shocking Necklace

Austrian physician and coroner Stefan Jellinek (1871 – 1968) founded The Electro-Pathological Museum in Vienna in 1936. This image is taken from his groundbreaking book, Elektroschutz in 132 Bildern (Electrical Protection in 132 Pictures). The project started in 1898 when, in his capacity as coroner, Jellinek started to document the increasing number of deaths caused by electric shocks. His son, E. H. Jellinek, wrote: “The exploding use of electricity in homes and industry in the second half of the 19th century was accompanied by many injuries and fatalities from electric currents. Their study by my father was the serendipitous outcome of his early work on possible blood pressure changes from electric currents in a career that started in internal medicine. It became his limited field of electro-pathology which embraced first aid, the care of the injured, histopathology and accident prevention. He was an enthusiastic teacher and collector of specimens, from tree trunks struck by lightning down to the microscopy of accidental and experimental electric lesions.”

Jellinek’s Electrical Safety: Shocking Overheads

Austrian physician and coroner Stefan Jellinek (1871 – 1968) founded The Electro-Pathological Museum in Vienna in 1936. This image is taken from his groundbreaking book, Elektroschutz in 132 Bildern (Electrical Protection in 132 Pictures). The project started in 1898 when, in his capacity as coroner, Jellinek started to document the increasing number of deaths caused by electric shocks. His son, E. H. Jellinek, wrote: “The exploding use of electricity in homes and industry in the second half of the 19th century was accompanied by many injuries and fatalities from electric currents. Their study by my father was the serendipitous outcome of his early work on possible blood pressure changes from electric currents in a career that started in internal medicine. It became his limited field of electro-pathology which embraced first aid, the care of the injured, histopathology and accident prevention. He was an enthusiastic teacher and collector of specimens, from tree trunks struck by lightning down to the microscopy of accidental and experimental electric lesions.”

Jellinek’s Electrical Safety: Grandpa’s Little Helper

Austrian physician and coroner Stefan Jellinek (1871 – 1968) founded The Electro-Pathological Museum in Vienna in 1936. This image is taken from his groundbreaking book, Elektroschutz in 132 Bildern (Electrical Protection in 132 Pictures). The project started in 1898 when, in his capacity as coroner, Jellinek started to document the increasing number of deaths caused by electric shocks. His son, E. H. Jellinek, wrote: “The exploding use of electricity in homes and industry in the second half of the 19th century was accompanied by many injuries and fatalities from electric currents. Their study by my father was the serendipitous outcome of his early work on possible blood pressure changes from electric currents in a career that started in internal medicine. It became his limited field of electro-pathology which embraced first aid, the care of the injured, histopathology and accident prevention. He was an enthusiastic teacher and collector of specimens, from tree trunks struck by lightning down to the microscopy of accidental and experimental electric lesions.”

Jellinek’s Electrical Safety: A Shocking Prank

Austrian physician and coroner Stefan Jellinek (1871 – 1968) founded The Electro-Pathological Museum in Vienna in 1936. This image is taken from his groundbreaking book, Elektroschutz in 132 Bildern (Electrical Protection in 132 Pictures). The project started in 1898 when, in his capacity as coroner, Jellinek started to document the increasing number of deaths caused by electric shocks. His son, E. H. Jellinek, wrote: “The exploding use of electricity in homes and industry in the second half of the 19th century was accompanied by many injuries and fatalities from electric currents. Their study by my father was the serendipitous outcome of his early work on possible blood pressure changes from electric currents in a career that started in internal medicine. It became his limited field of electro-pathology which embraced first aid, the care of the injured, histopathology and accident prevention. He was an enthusiastic teacher and collector of specimens, from tree trunks struck by lightning down to the microscopy of accidental and experimental electric lesions.”

Jellinek’s Electrical Safety: Nine Lives

Austrian physician and coroner Stefan Jellinek (1871 – 1968) founded The Electro-Pathological Museum in Vienna in 1936. This image is taken from his groundbreaking book, Elektroschutz in 132 Bildern (Electrical Protection in 132 Pictures). The project started in 1898 when, in his capacity as coroner, Jellinek started to document the increasing number of deaths caused by electric shocks. His son, E. H. Jellinek, wrote: “The exploding use of electricity in homes and industry in the second half of the 19th century was accompanied by many injuries and fatalities from electric currents. Their study by my father was the serendipitous outcome of his early work on possible blood pressure changes from electric currents in a career that started in internal medicine. It became his limited field of electro-pathology which embraced first aid, the care of the injured, histopathology and accident prevention. He was an enthusiastic teacher and collector of specimens, from tree trunks struck by lightning down to the microscopy of accidental and experimental electric lesions.”